2016 U.S. Presidential Election Coverage

HR professionals must prepare for Donald Trump's proposed workplace policies

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With the presidential election complete, it is time for HR professionals to review and prepare for president-elect Donald Trump's proposed workplace policies. 

The following is an archive of SHRM's post-election coverage. New articles will be added as the election cycle continues.


Donald Trump's Workplace Policies:

Donald Trump Trump’s Ideas for Change in the Workplace
Now that Donald Trump has been elected president, HR professionals are reviewing his positions on issues affecting the workplace. 

In some cases, he is calling for less regulation; in other situations, he calls for more. And his proposals aren't without controversy.


In Focus: Donald Trump’s First 100 Days
President-elect Donald Trump has called for the repeal of the Affordable Care Act within the first 100 days of his presidency. He has called the law "an absolute disaster for families and small businesses."


Post-Election Coverage:

Trump Faces Choice on Overtime Appeal
The Department of Labor (DOL) under President-elect Donald Trump may withdraw the DOL's appeal of a preliminary blocking of the federal overtime rule if there hasn't been a decision on the appeal by Inauguration Day. But there's a slight chance the appeal will be decided before Jan. 20, though every day that goes by without an order on the appeal makes the chance of it "exponentially narrower," said Eric Magnus, an attorney with Jackson Lewis in Atlanta. 


In Focus: Elaine Chao Will Be New Transportation Secretary
Elaine L. Chao, who served for eight years as secretary of labor under President George W. Bush, as well as deputy secretary of transportation for President George H.W. Bush, has been named secretary of transportation by President-elect Donald Trump.


Election Results and Supreme Court Vacancy Raise Questions for the Workplace
Justice Antonin Scalia's passing earlier this year and the recent presidential election are two events that have had a wide impact on the wage and hour arena in recent months, according to Christopher Parlo, an attorney with Morgan Lewis in New York City.

Post-Election Emotions Run High in the Workplace
"It was like somebody died. There was really a lot of grief, and you don't just ignore that. We're not a political organization, and we don't have political conversations in the office, so I wasn't sure how to navigate this … how to acknowledge the feelings that [Hillary Clinton supporters] were having without potentially marginalizing others who had voted [for Trump]." 


Woman and child Trump’s Maternity Leave Proposal May Not Be Popular on Capitol Hill
Once Donald Trump becomes president, he may find critics of his paid maternity leave proposal on both sides of the aisle. Republican-supported legislation for banking compensatory time to cover future family leave needs may have brighter prospects. Even that may be a long shot, though, as its chief sponsor, Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., was not re-elected.

Trump Immigration Policy Likely to Be Enforcement-Heavy
President-elect Donald Trump campaigned with an immigration enforcement-first message, focusing on border and worksite enforcement and protecting U.S. workers' jobs. 

Much attention has been focused on how President-elect Donald Trump and the Republicans in Congress will approach health care benefits, but less has been said about the incoming administration's views on retirement benefits. That's because retirement savings, while critical for Americans' security and well-being, wasn't addressed much during the campaign.

Woman working overtime What the Donald Trump Presidency Could Mean for the FLSA Overtime Rule
President-elect Donald Trump can't do much about the Dec. 1 effective date of the new overtime rule, which doubles the exempt salary threshold under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to $47,476. But he may be receptive to calling for a small-business exemption and doing away with the triennial automatic increases after he takes office Jan. 20.

ACA Likely to Change Substantially but Full Repeal Unlikely
President Donald Trump and GOP congressional leaders are expected to first make a grand gesture of trying to repeal the ACA, and then start negotiating with Democrats on changing the law in ways that can attract enough senators from both parties to pass the 60-vote threshold. Alternatively, Republicans may use the process of budget reconciliation—in which a simple Senate majority is needed to pass measures related to spending.

President-Elect Trump’s Paid Parental Leave Is Only for Mothers After Childbirth
In September, then-candidate Donald Trump unveiled a plan to guarantee six weeks of paid maternity leave for new mothers after childbirth. It does not extend to new fathers, parents who adopt nor those who have children through surrogacy.


State Ballot Initiatives:

Arizona and Washington Voters Approve Paid Sick Leave Measures

Voters in Arizona and Washington approved ballot measures that will require employers to offer paid sick leave to workers beginning in 2017 and 2018, respectively. The two states join Connecticut, California, Massachusetts, Oregon and Vermont in offering statewide paid-sick-leave programs. And a wave of similar ordinances has swept through cities and counties across the country.

Existing Laws:
City/County
Statewide
Statewide and city/county
Nov. Ballot Measures:
Statewide
Some paid sick leave laws have passed, but have not yet taken effect. Source: www.abetterbalance.org
Click on a state for more information about its paid sick leave laws.

More States Legalize Recreational and Medical Marijuana
The trend to legalize marijuana continued on Nov. 8 as voters in nine states cast ballots on the issue. Although not all results are in, ballot measures have passed in seven of those states so far. 

Voters Approve Minimum-Wage Hikes in Four States
The movement to raise the minimum wage in cities and states across the country has gained momentum in recent years, and voters in four states showed there's no sign of it slowing down.

Voters decided several state ballot initiatives involving marijuana legalization, minimum wage, paid sick leave and right-to-work laws. 


Politics in the Workplace

Post-Election Emotions Run High in the Workplace
"It was like somebody died. There was really a lot of grief, and you don't just ignore that. We're not a political organization, and we don't have political conversations in the office, so I wasn't sure how to navigate this … how to acknowledge the feelings that [Hillary Clinton supporters] were having without potentially marginalizing others who had voted [for Trump]." 

Executive Onboarding Lessons from Presidential Transitions
Imagine what would happen if your company’s entire executive leadership and management teams up and left at the same time, handing over their badges and turning off the lights without leaving so much as a list of tips behind for the folks who would replace them. Thousands of vacancies would open up in an instant—and your HR team would have less than three months to recruit for those positions. 

How to Win at Office Politics
There's no escaping office politics, so learn how to cultivate your power and use it wisely. 
 

Presidential Election Is Stressing Out Workers, Hurting ProductivityPresidential Election Is Stressing Out Workers, Hurting Productivity
The contest between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump for president of the United States stressed out workers and incited workplace arguments that hurt productivity, according to new findings by the American Psychological Association (APA).

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