The DOL's Model FMLA Forms Expired. Now What?

Until new ones are issued, employers should continue using the expired forms

By Jeff Nowak, © Franczek Radelet P.C. Mar 3, 2015
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Update: New FMLA Forms Expire in 2018

In May 2015, the U.S. Department of Labor published new model Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) forms with slight revisions. The forms are valid through May 2018. See the SHRM Online article DOL Publishes New FMLA Forms—Good Through May 2018.


On Feb. 28, 2015, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) recommended Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) forms expired. And on March 1, the sun still rose in the east. Life, as we know it, forged on.

It’s anyone’s guess as to when new FMLA forms will be issued, so in the meantime, I’ll hold off on belting out, in true Steve Martin fashion from the movie The Jerk: “The New FMLA Forms Are Here! The New FMLA Forms Are Here!

Why Do the DOL’s FMLA Forms Expire Anyway?

Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the DOL is required to submit its FMLA forms every three years to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval, so that OMB can review the DOL’s information requests and the time employers spend responding to the requests. OMB approved the DOL’s FMLA forms in early 2012 for the maximum period of three years. Upon expiration of the forms (in this case, this past Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015), the DOL may continue to use the forms while it seeks renewal of OMB’s approval.

Should Employers Continue to Use the Expired FMLA Forms?

Yes, for two reasons: 1) This past week, OMB extended the FMLA forms’ expiration date by 30 days to March 31, 2015 (so, I guess you could say that the forms are no longer expired, right?); and 2) in my discussions with the agency, the DOL has advised me that the best approach is for employers to continue to use the forms even after the expiration date and until further notice. Of course, this makes a whole lot of (common) sense.

The DOL’s forms–with the March 31, 2015 expiration date–can be accessed here:

Do We Have Any Say in What’s Included in the New FMLA Forms?

From now until March 27, 2015, the public is invited to submit comments about the FMLA forms, including any changes we’d like included in any new FMLA forms that eventually will be issued. Specifics on the comment period can be accessed here, but public comments can be directed to the DOL by U.S. mail or by email at OIRA_submission@omb.eop.gov.

Count the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission among the first to propose changes to the FMLA forms. A few months back, in November 2014, the EEOC sent a missive to the DOL asking that the DOL add: 1) a disclaimer in its model medical certification (for an employee’s serious health condition) instructing health care providers not to collect or provide any genetic information, as this information is prohibited under the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act (GINA); and 2) stronger language in WH-380-E (employee medical certification) and WH-380-F (family member medical certification) regarding the employer’s obligation to keep medical genetic information strictly confidential.

Employers should work with their employment counsel to review and amend their FMLA forms to include the suggestions above and to streamline forms to fit your operational needs.

Jeff Nowak is a partner at the law firm Franczek Radelet P.C. and author of the FMLA Insights blog, where this article originally appeared. © 2015 Franczek Radelet P.C. All rights reserved. Republished with permission.

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